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Specific requirements for the outpatient specialist care of hemophilia

Tue, 2019 / 05 / 07

The Federal Joint Committee (G-BA) approved the specific requirements for the treatment of haemophilia in outpatient specialist medical care (German: "ambulante spezialfachärztliche Versorgung", ASV). The decision of the Federal Joint Committee from March, 22nd 2019, allows haemophilia patients a treatment within the framework of the ASV and a benefit from the cooperation of specialists.

The legal basis for the ASV is §116b SGB V, stating that not only hospitals, but also specialists in private practice can offer a specialized medical care as an outpatient, coordinated service. The specific requirements of the G-BA for the ASV are defined as the scope of treatment and the requirements for the interdisciplinary team, as well as the extent to which telemedical services can generally be part of the ASV offer.

  • The interdisciplinary team for the treatment of haemophilia consists of team leader, core team and, if necessary, medical specialists. 
  • The team management for haemophilia can be taken over by specialists in internal medicine - even without a specialization but with additional further training in haemostaseology -, haematooncologists or transfusion physicians. 
  • The ASV core team must include internal specialists and transfusion physicians with additional further training in haemostaseology as well as orthopedists. 
  • For children and teenagers, an additional specialist in pediatrics and youth medicine with appropriate additional training must be brought on board. 
  • The ASV core team should treat at least 30 patients with severe hemophilia per year.

Hemophilia is a congenital blood clotting disorder. The bleeding occurs with varying severity, even without external injuries, both in the area of the skin and in joints and muscles. Haemophilia can be caused by many mutation variants of coagulation factor genes. Overall, haemophilia is a rare disease that mainly affects men. About 6,000 people are currently suffering from this disease in Germany.

However, haemophilia care is not only discussed in this context. A symposium on the topic of "hemophiliac care control" was held in Berlin in February 2019, moderated by Prof. Dr. Matthias P. Schönermark as conference leader. 

BY Prof. Matthias P. Schönermark, M.D., Ph.D., managing director and Hong Hanh Cao

Source: 

G-BA Press Release(German only)

Meine Haemophilie: Welthaemophilietag 2019

About the author

Ihr Ansprechpartner Prof. Matthias P. Schönermark, M.D., Ph.D.
Prof. Matthias P. Schönermark, M.D., Ph.D.
Founder and Managing Director
Fon: +49 511 64 68 14 – 0
Fax: +49 511 64 68 14 – 18
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